Good news, everyone! Comics aren’t just for kids any more! I know we’ve been saying this for a while – about Watchmen, about Fun Home, about Maus – but we really mean it this time. Adults of impeccable taste who enjoy really good books, as long as they’re reliably proven to be literature by the judges of major literary prizes sponsored by famous coffee chains, are finally allowed to read stuff that comes with pictures as well as text. Huzzah!

Now, I don’t begrudge Dotter of her Father’s Eyes its success. I don’t begrudge it anything, in fact, because it’s splendid. It combines two of my favourite ographies, biography and autobiography, and does so with aplomb. If you’re not familiar with Mary Talbot’s work on critical discourse analysis, or Bryan Talbot’s stint at 2000AD in the eighties and/or taste in bad puns, there’s no need to worry. Even if you weren’t lucky enough (as at least two thirds of the ConSequential team were) to see Bryan bumming a smoke off someone outside the main hall at Thought Bubble this year, you’ve got nothing to worry about with Dotter. It’s both charming and accessible. Maybe that’s why fancy people love it so much.

I should confess at this point that I, too, am fancy people.

Read On…