Posts Tagged ‘Bryan Talbot’

Podcast 32 – Agony Ant-Man

ConSequential Podcast 32 - Agony Ant-Man

This week we’re giving something back to the people. As Agony Ant-Man, we take listener questions and pump out good advice and comics-related wisdom at a frankly disturbing volume. As in quantity. If it’s too loud, turn it down. We can’t do everything for you. Read On…

Podcast Episode 16 – Myth (Part Two)

A Brief Ode to Foyles

Like most other vaguely literate twenty-something book nerds living in the provinces, I really like Foyles. There’s something about going there – although I am at perfect liberty to do so whenever I please – which feels like a bit of a treat. The Jazz Café. The enormous poetry section, which was willing to sell me the collected works of Anne Sexton when a) neither of the Plymouth branches of Waterstones would and b) it was probably a bad idea to do so. And, of course, the really excellent selection of comics – far better, especially in terms of indies, than many dedicated comics shops outside of the capital.

And now they’ve turned the hoardings in front of their main shop on Charing Cross Road into a giant comic detailing the history of the Foyle family and the store. John Miers kicks things off in 1903, when the Foyle brothers failed their Civil Service exams and made rather a lot of money selling their textbooks, Donya Todd brings us up to the present day with a charming, witty literary salon, and Rian Hughes illustrates the future of the Foyles site. In between, there are panels from Karrie Fransman, Steven Appleby, ConSequential sweetheart Hannah Berry, Bryan Talbot and a whole host of other artists.

Read On…

Sad Comics Reviewed: Dotter of Her Father’s Eyes

Good news, everyone! Comics aren’t just for kids any more! I know we’ve been saying this for a while – about Watchmen, about Fun Home, about Maus – but we really mean it this time. Adults of impeccable taste who enjoy really good books, as long as they’re reliably proven to be literature by the judges of major literary prizes sponsored by famous coffee chains, are finally allowed to read stuff that comes with pictures as well as text. Huzzah!

Now, I don’t begrudge Dotter of her Father’s Eyes its success. I don’t begrudge it anything, in fact, because it’s splendid. It combines two of my favourite ographies, biography and autobiography, and does so with aplomb. If you’re not familiar with Mary Talbot’s work on critical discourse analysis, or Bryan Talbot’s stint at 2000AD in the eighties and/or taste in bad puns, there’s no need to worry. Even if you weren’t lucky enough (as at least two thirds of the ConSequential team were) to see Bryan bumming a smoke off someone outside the main hall at Thought Bubble this year, you’ve got nothing to worry about with Dotter. It’s both charming and accessible. Maybe that’s why fancy people love it so much.

I should confess at this point that I, too, am fancy people.

Read On…