Jonathan Cape *didn’t* send us their entire 2016 catalogue gift-wrapped in fivers, and what happened next may surprise you…

For the last few years The Guardian has done a “best of the year” comics roundup. It’s pretty good. Lots of sites do it. We do one too – it’s practically a Christmas tradition.

Just as much of a tradition, however, is pointing and laughing at The Guardian’s for being:

  1. basically just whatever Jonathan Cape published that year
  2. a little bit nose-in-the-air Worthy/joyless

This year’s did not disappoint:

When I began writing about graphic novels a decade ago, I remember worrying slightly about the supply line: would I really be able to find a good one to review every month?

[but…] if there isn’t something to suit everyone on the bulging list that follows, I’ll eat my copy of Persepolis.

Uh huh…

Anchoring your readers on Persepolis, saying “Graphic Novels”, authorizing yourself with the decade thing, and worrying that (in 2006, FFS) there weren’t enough? There’s a klaxon or two sounding there, a grasp for validity.

The list that follows is – of course – mostly from Serious Publisher Jonathan Cape.

But is our scepticism really fair? We did a budget data journalism to find out.

Read On…

Cowboys and Insects – David Hine & Shaky Kane

Now, I can’t promise that if you watched King of the Hill after dropping acid it would look exactly like Cowboys and Insects. But those already familiar with Shaky Kane’s style and the amped-up pulp vibe he created with David Hine in The Bulletproof Coffin would likely find the experience quite familiar.

Cowboys and insects -  cattle drive

With its giant bugs, bright colours, ranch hands with rifles, and a sickly uncoiling of fifties American paranoia, Cowboys and Insects is a lurid thing that takes us to a pretty severe place.

Childhood wonder to lynch mob in twenty pages, each step feeling natural and normal, and not worthy of moral scrutiny. 

Cowboys and insects - cover closeup

First published digitally in 2013, when it wasn’t a given that white America would plump for fascism in a fit of butthurt cultural pique, Cowboys and Insects seems oddly prescient now.

Much of its effect, I think comes not from being on-the-nose preachy, but rather from running full-tilt at the joyous daftness of the premise and letting that carry it through.

Read On…

Podcast 65 – Thought Bubble Hauls

ConSequential Podcast 65 - More Thought Bubble

We’re back from Thought Bubble and here to tell you about the exciting things we picked up – including several hideous diseases! But more than that we got some great new comics and interviewed some interesting creators. Let us tell you what you would have bought if only you had our impeccable taste. Read On…

Look at all this amazing queer stuff!

Queer comics (and the whole super-set of LGBTQ goodness) are a perennial topic for us, not least because I won’t shut up about them, and we’ve done an annual round-up episode on the podcast for the last couple of years:

So I was on the lookout for queer content at Thought Bubble this year, and delightfully, just so many of the books at the show seemed to be somewhere in the LGBTQ ballpark.

minoritymonsters

rainbowroad

click to embiggen

Tab Kimpton (of Discord Comics) put together a “Thought Bubble Rainbow Road” this year, highlighting LGBTQ comics, creators and merch. Chatting to him (more of that on the podcast), he put the proportion somewhere a nose over eleven percent.

I didn’t scratch the surface of that, but here’s a quick round-up of what I found.

Read On…

Podcast 64 – Thought Bubble 2016

ConSequential Podcast 64 - Thought Bubble 2016

It’s that time of year again, so Roger and Dave are at Thought Bubble with special guests the people who could be lured back to their hotel room with cheap wine and a cocked eyebrow Dave Barker and Hester Wells (from heirloom-comic.com), and Clarrie Maguire (of ProblemChimp.com – specialist bookkeeping for all your starving artist needs).

They’re all drinking chocolate-flavoured British wine (as distinct from English wine, people on Twitter get very huffy if you confuse the two. So, what was the best of day one? Read On…

Thought Bubble 2016 – our hot picks and odd excitements

Here at Consequential dot net, Thought Bubble is our absolute favourite festival occurring between Halloween and the Beaujolais Nouveau.

Seriously though, it’s  probably the best comics event in the UK, and it’s a great time to:

  1. discover some amazing new comics.
  2. dance like several hundred people are watching, but are all just too lovely and welcoming to even form an opinion about that thing you’re doing with your hands.

We love the ol’ T’Bubz, and here’s a selection of things we’re looking out for, including some old favourites and interesting debuts.

The Nameless City - Faith Erin Hicks & Jordie Bellaire

The Nameless City – Faith Erin Hicks & Jordie Bellaire

Read On…

Podcast 63 – Objectification / #Butts

ConSequential Podcast 63 - Objectification also butts I guess

Just like he kinetically charges his playing cards, Gambit sexually charges this chunky Scandinavian-style knitwear, courtesy of artist and comics-doer Dave Barker.

We’re joined in this episode by Hester Wells, the only guest we’ve ever had who has her own biographical comic that she didn’t draw herself (specificity, yo), to help us out with the thorny topic of objectification, particularly in mainstream comics.

This episode is groaning with comics, throbbing with intellectual discussion and glistening with salty language. Read On…

Podcast 62 – Food

ConSequential Podcast Episode 62 - Food

Food! For most of us it’s a sludgy nutrient paste we shove into the front of our withered forms to stretch their existence out for another grim and grey span. But did you know it can also be delicious? It’s true! We found many comics on the topic, and now we’re sharing their wisdom with you. Read On…

Podcast 61 – Fantasy

ConSequential Podcast 61 - Fantasy

We bravely set out to find the very best in fantasy comics, but we got badly sidetracked and got eaten by a Groo, a monster from a videogame that shares its name with a fantasy comic we didn’t actually cover. Will that do? I tried.

There’s a weird lack of fantasy comics, so we try to figure out why what Mr Hart so kindly refers to as “Elves and Swords and Bollocks” isn’t as prevalent as other genres.

Read On…

Podcast 60 – The Eisner Awards